Monday, March 05, 2007

Once in a blue moon

Last night, I thought I would see this:


I would have loved to have seen this:






But all I saw was this:






and that’s good enough for me because...

...every August, during La Nuit des Etoiles, I stand outside and stare at the sky, propping my eyelids open and willing myself not to fall asleep.

I stand there until the early hours of the morning.

Once, I stayed up all night.

And I have never ever seen a single shooting star. Not one. Aeroplanes and satellites by the dozen but shooting stars? They just sit there stubbornly twinkling and refuse to fall.



At least the moon had the decency to blush…

12 comments:

Sarah said...

I've seen shooting stars in the US when I spent a year in Dallas. It's a bit of a long way to go however...

Louise said...

The night of the eclipse I took the dog out, as usual, and the moon was very full and very bright, as the action hadn't started. I thought about taking a photo because it seemed to be so near and enormous - why when you photograph the moon, does it end up as a white pinprick on a black background when it's so clear and close to the naked eye? Don't bother to answer this anyone - I know nothing of photography and just have a camera where I press the button and it does all the rest!

I'v never seen shooting stars 'le nuit des etoiles' - got a stiff neck, got cold, fallen asleep, but no shooting stars. A few years ago, however, one night in October I think, I was walking the dog and in an hour I saw dozens and dozens - it was fabulous and I ran out of wishes!

Gigi said...

I think we ought to ask Bill how to take a photo of the moon - I'm sure he must know...

angela said...

Did you ever read The Day of the Triffids which begins with everyone going blind because they stayed up watching a meteorite shower? I simply haven't been able to watch a heavenly body ever since...
Angela

part-time buddha said...

The next meteor shower begins on March 10th and lasts about 4 days. On average, there are ten meteors visible per hour.

So grab a comfy blanket and head someplace dark and do something about having never seen a shooting star. You might even see two!

Gigi said...

I know I did read the Day of the Triffids - when I was about 14. I can't remember it at all - time for a re-read...

OK part-time buddha - that's Saturday. I'm going to sit outside and I'd better see one or else...

Louise said...

Problem, Gigi! Buddha lives in the US - will we see this in Europe?

Louise said...

PS If we can see this heavenly show in Europe, start writing your wish list, just in case you see loads!

bluevicar said...

Someday I'll tell you about the feast of falling stars that I experienced about 25 years ago...it was a delight! Just keep your eyes peeled, Gigi; you'll see one. You will.

Meilleurs voeux!!

Gigi said...

OK well, perhaps I'll have to wait until August after all. I'll start preparing the wishes...

roadsofstone said...

The eclipse greeted us as we left dinner at a friends' house. It was clear and sharp and spectacular, and all the more spectacularm for being so completely unexpected.

And as for Day of the Triffids - yes, that was one of my very favourite early reads as well. I read all of John Wyndham's books after that.

Muddy said...

Last August in the Creuse, we sat outside one night and saw about a dozen shooting stars! It was wonderful. There was a time a few years ago in November in South Carolina (USA), when my son and I went out at 3 a.m. for a promised meteor shower, and it was pure magic. We only went inside when we couldn't stand the cold anymore - it must've been about 7° C. The dogs romped about and came back to cold-nose us every few minutes, and the stars were shooting in all directions, some more spectacular than others. All in all, it was a fantastic experience!